jueves, mayo 13, 2010

EXTRA: Acaba de publicarse en Science un nuevo artículo en relación al Retrovirus XMRV.Comentarios Técnicos.14 de Mayo.

Respuesta a comentarios sobre "La detección de un retrovirus Infecciosas, XMRV, en las células sanguíneas de pacientes con Síndrome de fatiga crónica"
Comentarios Técnicos. Judy A. Mikovits1,* and Francis W. Ruscetti2

Viene fechado del día 14 de mayo(debe ser por la cuestión horaria, supongo), el artículo tiene un par de horas solamente.

¡Ojo al dato!. Recibido para publicación en Noviembre(el día 10) y aceptado en Abril de éste año(el día 19).

Pongo el artículo original en inglés y más abajo la traducción(podéis traducirlo no obstante con las banderitas de la derecha del blog):

Science 14 May 2010:
Vol. 328. no. 5980, p. 825
DOI: 10.1126/science.1184548


Technical Comments
Response to Comments on "Detection of an Infectious Retrovirus, XMRV, in Blood Cells of Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome"
Judy A. Mikovits1,* and Francis W. Ruscetti2

We reported the detection of the human gammaretrovirus XMRV in 67% of 101 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and in 3.7% of 218 healthy controls, but we did not claim that XMRV causes CFS. Here, we explain why the criticisms of Sudlow et al., Lloyd et al., and van der Meer et al. regarding the selection of patients and controls in our study are unwarranted.

1 Whittemore Peterson Institute, Reno, NV 89557, USA.
2 Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, National Cancer Institute–Frederick, Frederick, MD 21701, USA.

* To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: judym@wpinstitute.org

Our study (1) documented the presence of a recently discovered human retrovirus, XMRV, in a high proportion of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in comparison with healthy controls. Sudlow et al. (2), Lloyd et al. (3), and van der Meer et al. (4) raise concerns about the cases and controls described in our study and thus the validity of our results. First, we wish to emphasize that our study was not intended to be a detailed clinical description of CFS or an epidemiological study that would relate particular symptoms, demographics, duration, pattern of onset, and the like to the presence or viral load of XMRV. The study was not, nor was it designed to be, a case-control study as Sudlow et al. (2) imply, for it was the first demonstration of the replication and production of infectious XMRV in human blood cells. The fact that a number of the patients tested were from regions of CFS outbreaks does not invalidate the clinical diagnosis. We hope that our report will stimulate the performance of many case-control studies that use appropriate virus detection. We certainly recognize that such studies will be required to determine what role XMRV plays in the pathogenesis of CFS.

Samples included in our study (1) were from CFS patients who fulfilled both the Fukuda criteria and the Canadian Consensus Criteria (CCC), regardless of severity. We regret that a sentence in the original supporting online material in (1) implied that immunological abnormalities were part of the CFS diagnosis; indeed, while many such patients do exhibit such abnormalities (5, 6), they were not required for diagnosis. All patients that met Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and CCC criteria were accepted; none were excluded. Patient samples were obtained from 2006 to 2009 and stored in the Whittemore Peterson Institute (WPI) repository. We did not state in Lisbon (7) or elsewhere that the samples analyzed in (1) were only from patients from documented outbreaks of CFS, nor did we state that the 101 patients described in (1) exhibited all the immunological abnormalities described in our Lisbon conference presentation. In fact, only 25 samples in (1) came from patients identified during the 1984 to 1988 CFS outbreak in Incline Village, Nevada. The remaining 76 samples included patients with sporadic cases from 12 U.S. states and Canada, including California, New York, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Michigan, Oregon, New Mexico, New Jersey, North Dakota, Texas, and Florida. Patients in the study were 67% female, reflecting the reported gender incidence of CFS, with an age distribution of 19 to 75 years of age (mean of 55). The healthy control population, which was similar in age and gender to the patients, was composed of healthy people who visited doctors’ offices in the western United States between 2006 and 2008. The great majority, although not all, of the patients analyzed were matched in geographic location with controls. As this was not an epidemiological case-control study, we did not attempt to discern where the patients believed they contracted CFS; at the time of sample collection, some were undoubtedly living in an area different from the location where they first became ill.

The information we provide here and in the accompanying Supporting Online Material (8) should lay to rest any concerns about "bias" or "confounding." Again, the primary aim of the work described in (1) was not to characterize this clinical condition or to prove a cause for CFS but to demonstrate the existence of an infectious gammaretrovirus in patients who had been diagnosed with CFS. We achieved our goal using four different experimental strategies. The original description of HTLV-1 and HIV-1 involved only one or two patients (9–12), whereas we detected XMRV in 75 individuals.

We did not state that our study (1) proves the cause of CFS. A large number of infectious and noninfectious agents have been implicated in CFS, and it is that fact that makes the puzzle of CFS all the more difficult to solve. At no time have we wished to raise false hopes among a group of patients who, in general, have not been treated well by the medical research community. We are aware that many different pathogens have previously been reported to be associated with CFS but have not been proven to be causal.

We further note that no cytokine profiles were presented in (1), nor did we state that abnormal cytokine levels, altered natural killer cell activity, or particular RNase L profiles were a requirement for inclusion in the study. Unpublished comments made during a medical conference (7) exploring hypothetical connections with immune system defects, viral reactivation, and malignancies should not be used to judge the merits of the science in the published paper. Regarding the concern raised by Sudlow et al. (2) about potential "expectation bias," we point out that the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Cleveland Clinic, whose scientists independently performed experiments and coauthored (1), were certainly not "established" as laboratories for the purpose of studying CFS. All samples were blinded, as mandated by the NCI and WPI institutional review board approvals. All experimental procedures were done by the same personnel, in the same physical laboratory space, under identical protocols. Investigators at NCI received 100 samples from individuals without knowing their health status; furthermore, the samples were sent to NCI directly without passing through the WPI laboratory space. Laboratory workers at the NCI and the WPI who performed the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunological studies used coded, blinded samples that did not reveal the CFS status of the individuals. The WPI has examined all 218 control and 101 patient samples by both PCR and serological methods for the presence of XMRV nucleic acid and antibodies. In addition, NCI used plasma from all 100 samples they received in infection experiments with LNCaP cells. It was not feasible to examine all 101 patient and 218 control samples with all four XMRV detection methods described in (1), due to time and resource constraints.

Of the technologies used to identify and isolate XMRV in patients with CFS, PCR from DNA or cDNA from unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells is the least sensitive method. We contend that the three recently published negative PCR studies (13–15) do not qualify as being studies that fail to replicate our study, as neither the same PCR methodologies were used nor did these studies draw on the additional cell culture and immunological methods that we employed to observe XMRV nucleic acids and proteins. Although we offer to send samples in which we have detected XMRV, the groups that published these results neither requested nor analyzed any samples we had found positive for XMRV in our laboratories.

Sudlow et al. erroneously state that we did not consider alternative explanations for the findings, namely that patients with poor general health may be more susceptible to viral and other infections. On the contrary, we raised as a question for future study: "Is XMRV infection a causal factor in the pathogenesis of CFS or a passenger virus in the immunosuppressed CFS patient population?" (1). We recognize that the presence of XMRV could be due to enhanced susceptibility to retroviral infection after development of CFS. A causal role of XMRV in CFS is an intriguing possibility, given the known immunosuppressive, neurotropic, and serious consequences of infection with other known retroviruses.


Supporting Online Material

www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/328/5980/825-d/DC1

SOM Text

References

References and Notes

* 1. V. C. Lombardi et al., Detection of an infectious retrovirus, XMRV, in blood cells of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Science 326, 585 (2009). [Abstract/Free Full Text]
* 2. C. Sudlow, M. Macleod, R. Al-Shahi Salman, J. Stone, Science 328, 825 (2010); www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/328/5980/825-a.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
* 3. A. Lloyd, P. White, S. Wessely, M. Sharpe, D. Buchwald, Science 328, 825 (2010); www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/328/5980/825-b.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
* 4. J. W. M. van der Meer, M. G. Netea, J. M. D. Galama, F. J. M. van Kuppeveld, . Science 328, 825 (2010); www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/328/5980/825-c.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
* 5. N. G. Klimas, F. R. Salvato, R. Morgan, M. A. Fletcher, Immunologic abnormalities in chronic fatigue syndrome. J. Clin. Microbiol. 28, 1403 (1990).[Abstract/Free Full Text]
* 6. K. J. Maher, N. G. Klimas, M. A. Fletcher, Chronic fatigue syndrome is associated with diminished intracellular perforin. Clin. Exp. Immunol. 142, 505 (2005). [Web of Science] [Medline]
* 7. J. A. Mikovits, presentation at Conference on Cellular and Cytokine Interactions in Health and Disease, Lisbon, Portugal, 17 to 21 October 2009).
* 8. Additional patient information is provided as Supporting Online Material.
* 9. F. Barré-Sinoussi et al., Isolation of a T-lymphotropic retrovirus from a patient at risk for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Science 220, 868 (1983). [Abstract/Free Full Text]
* 10. R. C. Gallo et al., Isolation of human T-cell leukemia virus in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Science 220, 865 (1983). [Abstract/Free Full Text]
* 11. B. J. Poiesz et al., Detection and isolation of type C retrovirus particles from fresh and cultured lymphocytes of a patient with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 7415 (1980). [Abstract/Free Full Text]
* 12. B. J. Poiesz, F. W. Ruscetti, M. S. Reitz, V. S. Kalyanaraman, R. C. Gallo, Isolation of a new type C retrovirus (HTLV) in primary uncultured cells of a patient with Sézary T-cell leukaemia. Nature 294, 268 (1981). [CrossRef] [Medline]
* 13. O. Erlwein et al., Failure to detect the novel retrovirus XMRV in chronic fatigue syndrome. PLoS ONE 5, e8519 (2010). [CrossRef] [Medline]
* 14. H. C. Groom et al., Absence of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus in UK patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Retrovirology 7, 10 (2010). [CrossRef] [Medline]
* 15. F. J. M. van Kuppeveld et al., Prevalence of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome in the Netherlands: retrospective analysis of samples from an established cohort. BMJ 340, c1018 (2010). [Abstract/Free Full Text]
* 16. Patent applications were submitted for XMRV detection methods in CFS by the WPI, a not-for-profit 501c3. J.A.M. has signed over any personal rights she may have on royalties from these patents to the WPI.

Received for publication 10 November 2009. Accepted for publication 19 April 2010.


================================================


Respuesta a comentarios sobre "La detección de un retrovirus Infecciosas, XMRV, en las células sanguíneas de pacientes con Síndrome de fatiga crónica"

Se reporta la detección de la XMRV gammaretrovirus humanos en el 67% de 101 pacientes con el síndrome de fatiga crónica (SFC) y en el 3,7% de 218 controles sanos, pero no ha hecho valer que XMRV las causas de CFS. Aquí, explicamos por qué las críticas de Sudlow et al., Lloyd et al., Y van der Meer et al. relativa a la selección de pacientes y controles en nuestro estudio son injustificadas.

1 Whittemore Peterson Institute, Reno, NV 89557, EE.UU..
2 Laboratorio de Inmunología Experimental, Instituto Nacional del Cáncer-Frederick, Frederick, MD 21701, EE.UU..

* ¿A quién debe dirigirse la correspondencia. E-mail: judym@wpinstitute.org

Nuestro estudio (1) documentó la presencia de un retrovirus humano descubierto recientemente, XMRV, en una alta proporción de pacientes con síndrome de fatiga crónica (SFC) en comparación con controles sanos. Sudlow et al. (2), Lloyd et al. (3), y Van der Meer et al. (4) sus preocupaciones acerca de los casos y controles que se describen en nuestro estudio y por lo tanto la validez de nuestros resultados. En primer lugar, queremos destacar que nuestro estudio no pretende ser una descripción clínica detallada del síndrome de fatiga crónica o un estudio epidemiológico que se refieren síntomas específicos, la demografía, la duración, el patrón de aparición, y similares a la presencia o la carga viral del XMRV. El estudio no fue, ni fue diseñado para ser un estudio de caso-control, Sudlow et al. (2) implica, pues era la primera demostración de la replicación y la producción de XMRV infecciosos en las células de la sangre humana. El hecho de que varios de los pacientes analizados eran de regiones de los brotes de síndrome de fatiga crónica no invalida el diagnóstico clínico. Esperamos que nuestro informe estimule la realización de numerosos estudios de casos y controles que el uso adecuado de detección de virus. Desde luego, reconocer que estos estudios serán necesarios para determinar qué papel juega XMRV en la patogénesis del SFC.

Las muestras incluidas en nuestro estudio (1) fueron de pacientes con SFC que cumplen tanto los criterios de Fukuda y el canadiense criterios de consenso (CCC), independientemente de la gravedad. Lamentamos que una condena en el material original en línea de apoyo en (1) implica que las anormalidades inmunológicas fueron parte del diagnóstico del CFS, de hecho, mientras que muchos de estos pacientes no presentan anomalías tales (5, 6), no se requiere para el diagnóstico. Todos los pacientes que cumplen los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de la CCC y los criterios fueron aceptados, pero ninguno se excluyó. Las muestras de pacientes se obtuvieron desde 2006 hasta 2009 y se almacena en el Instituto Peterson Whittemore (WPI) repositorio. No hemos estado en Lisboa (7) o en otra parte que las muestras analizadas en (1) sólo de pacientes de los brotes documentados de síndrome de fatiga crónica, ni tampoco podemos afirmar que los 101 pacientes descritos en (1) exhibió todas las alteraciones inmunológicas descritas en nuestro Lisboa la conferencia de presentación. De hecho, sólo 25 muestras en (1) procedían de pacientes identificados durante el brote de 1984 a 1988 CFS en Incline Village, Nevada. Los restantes 76 muestras incluyeron a pacientes con casos esporádicos de 12 estados de EE.UU. y Canadá, incluyendo California, Nueva York, Carolina del Norte, Wisconsin, Michigan, Oregon, Nuevo México, Nueva Jersey, Dakota del Norte, Texas y Florida. Los pacientes del estudio eran 67% mujeres, lo que refleja la incidencia de género notificados de síndrome de fatiga crónica, con una distribución de edades de 19 a 75 años de edad (media de 55). El control de la población sana, que es similar en edad y sexo de los pacientes, se componía de personas sanas que visitaron los consultorios médicos en el oeste de los Estados Unidos entre 2006 y 2008. La gran mayoría, aunque no todos, de los pacientes analizados fueron agrupados en la ubicación geográfica con los controles. Como esto no fue un estudio epidemiológico de casos y controles, no se intentó discernir donde los pacientes creían que contrajo síndrome de fatiga crónica; en el momento de la recogida de muestras, algunos fueron, sin duda, vivir en una zona diferente de la ubicación en donde primero se enfermó.

La información que proporcionamos aquí y en el acompañamiento de apoyo en línea del material (8) debe dejar de lado cualquier preocupación por el "sesgo" o "confusión". Una vez más, el objetivo principal de la labor descrita en (1) no fue para caracterizar este estado clínico o para probar una causa para CFS, sino para demostrar la existencia de un gammaretrovirus infecciosas en pacientes que habían sido diagnosticados con síndrome de fatiga crónica. Hemos alcanzado nuestro objetivo por medio de cuatro estrategias experimentales diferentes. La descripción original de la infección por HTLV-1 y VIH-1 que participan sólo en uno o dos pacientes (9-12), mientras que se detectaron en 75 individuos XMRV.

No hemos dicho de que nuestro estudio (1) prueba la causa de CFS. Un gran número de agentes infecciosos y no infecciosos se han implicado en el SFC, y es este hecho que hace que el enigma de la CFS tanto más difícil de resolver. En ningún momento hemos querido crear falsas expectativas entre un grupo de pacientes que, en general, no han sido bien tratados por los investigadores médicos. Somos conscientes de que muchos agentes patógenos diferentes se han divulgado previamente para ser asociados con el CFS, pero no han demostrado ser causal.

Además, observamos que no hay ningún perfil de citoquinas fueron presentados en (1), ni tampoco podemos afirmar que los niveles anormales de citoquinas, alteración de la actividad de las células NK, o particulares perfiles de RNasa L fueron un requisito para la inclusión en el estudio. Comentarios no publicados realizados durante una conferencia médica (7) explorar las conexiones hipotéticas con defectos del sistema inmune, la reactivación viral, y enfermedades malignas no debe utilizarse para juzgar los méritos de la ciencia en los artículos publicados. En cuanto a la preocupación expresada por Sudlow et al. (2) sobre el sesgo potencial de expectativa "," nos recuerda que el Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI) y la Clínica Cleveland, cuyos científicos realizaron experimentos de forma independiente y es coautor (1), no eran "establecido" como laboratorios para el fin de estudiar SFC. Todas las muestras fueron cegados, según lo dispuesto por el NCI y el IPM aprobaciones junta de revisión institucional. Todos los procedimientos experimentales fueron realizados por el mismo personal, en el espacio de laboratorio mismas características físicas, los protocolos idénticos. Los investigadores en el Instituto Nacional del Cáncer recibió 100 muestras de individuos sin saber su estado de salud y, además, las muestras fueron enviadas al Instituto Nacional del Cáncer directamente sin pasar por el espacio de laboratorio WPI. Los trabajadores de laboratorio en el Instituto Nacional del Cáncer y el IPM que llevó a cabo la reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (PCR) y los estudios inmunológicos utilizados codificado, muestras ciegas que no reveló el estado de síndrome de fatiga crónica de los individuos. El WPI ha examinado todo el control 218 y 101 muestras de pacientes tanto por PCR y los métodos serológicos para detectar la presencia de ácido nucleico XMRV y anticuerpos. Además, el NCI utiliza el plasma de las 100 muestras que recibieron en los experimentos con células LNCaP infección. No fue posible examinar todos los pacientes 101 y 218 muestras de control con los cuatro métodos de detección XMRV se describe en (1), debido a limitaciones de tiempo y recursos.

De las tecnologías utilizadas para identificar y aislar XMRV en pacientes con síndrome de fatiga crónica, PCR de ADN o las células no estimuladas cDNA de mononucleares de sangre periférica es el método menos sensible. Sostenemos que los tres estudios publicados recientemente PCR negativos (13-15) no califican como los estudios que no replicar nuestro estudio, ya que ni las metodologías PCR se utilizaron los mismos ni estos estudios se basan en el cultivo celular adicionales y métodos inmunológicos que hemos empleado para observar XMRV ácidos nucleicos y proteínas. Aunque nos complace enviarles muestras en las que hemos detectado XMRV, los grupos que publicaron estos resultados no solicitaron ni se analizaron las muestras que había encontrado positivo para XMRV en nuestros laboratorios.

Sudlow et al. erróneamente el estado que no tuvo en cuenta las explicaciones alternativas para las conclusiones, a saber, que los pacientes con mala salud en general pueden ser más susceptibles a las infecciones virales y otros. Por el contrario, hemos planteado como una cuestión para futuros estudios: "¿La infección por XMRV es un factor causal en la patogénesis del síndrome de fatiga crónica o un virus de pasajeros en la población de pacientes inmunodeprimidos síndrome de fatiga crónica? (1). Reconocemos que la presencia de XMRV podría deberse a la mayor susceptibilidad al infección retroviral después del desarrollo del síndrome de fatiga crónica. Un papel causal de XMRV en el SFC es una intrigante posibilidad, dada la inmunosupresión conocido, neurotrópico y las consecuencias graves de la infección con otros retrovirus conocido.

Material de apoyo en línea
www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/328/5980/825-d/DC1

SOM Text

References


References and Notes

  • 1. V. C. Lombardi et al., Detection of an infectious retrovirus, XMRV, in blood cells of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Science 326, 585 (2009). [Abstract/Free Full Text]
  • 2. C. Sudlow, M. Macleod, R. Al-Shahi Salman, J. Stone, Science 328, 825 (2010); www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/328/5980/825-a.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
  • 3. A. Lloyd, P. White, S. Wessely, M. Sharpe, D. Buchwald, Science 328, 825 (2010); www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/328/5980/825-b.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
  • 4. J. W. M. van der Meer, M. G. Netea, J. M. D. Galama, F. J. M. van Kuppeveld, . Science 328, 825 (2010); www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/328/5980/825-c.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
  • 5. N. G. Klimas, F. R. Salvato, R. Morgan, M. A. Fletcher, Immunologic abnormalities in chronic fatigue syndrome. J. Clin. Microbiol. 28, 1403 (1990).[Abstract/Free Full Text]
  • 6. K. J. Maher, N. G. Klimas, M. A. Fletcher, Chronic fatigue syndrome is associated with diminished intracellular perforin. Clin. Exp. Immunol. 142, 505 (2005). [Web of Science] [Medline]
  • 7. J. A. Mikovits, presentation at Conference on Cellular and Cytokine Interactions in Health and Disease, Lisbon, Portugal, 17 to 21 October 2009).
  • 8. Additional patient information is provided as Supporting Online Material.
  • 9. F. Barré-Sinoussi et al., Isolation of a T-lymphotropic retrovirus from a patient at risk for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Science 220, 868 (1983). [Abstract/Free Full Text]
  • 10. R. C. Gallo et al., Isolation of human T-cell leukemia virus in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Science 220, 865 (1983). [Abstract/Free Full Text]
  • 11. B. J. Poiesz et al., Detection and isolation of type C retrovirus particles from fresh and cultured lymphocytes of a patient with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 7415 (1980). [Abstract/Free Full Text]
  • 12. B. J. Poiesz, F. W. Ruscetti, M. S. Reitz, V. S. Kalyanaraman, R. C. Gallo, Isolation of a new type C retrovirus (HTLV) in primary uncultured cells of a patient with Sézary T-cell leukaemia. Nature 294, 268 (1981). [CrossRef] [Medline]
  • 13. O. Erlwein et al., Failure to detect the novel retrovirus XMRV in chronic fatigue syndrome. PLoS ONE 5, e8519 (2010). [CrossRef] [Medline]
  • 14. H. C. Groom et al., Absence of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus in UK patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Retrovirology 7, 10 (2010). [CrossRef] [Medline]
  • 15. F. J. M. van Kuppeveld et al., Prevalence of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome in the Netherlands: retrospective analysis of samples from an established cohort. BMJ 340, c1018 (2010). [Abstract/Free Full Text]
  • 16. Patent applications were submitted for XMRV detection methods in CFS by the WPI, a not-for-profit 501c3. J.A.M. has signed over any personal rights she may have on royalties from these patents to the WPI.
Recibido para su publicación 10 de noviembre 2009. Aceptado para su publicación 19 de abril 2010.

=========

Añadido 17 mayo:

Ya se ha publicado en PUBMED, pero, para mi MAYOR asombro, vienen los apartados a), b) y c) .... ¡pero no el d)! que es precisamente éste de la Dra. Mikovitz. Estuve esperando por si tardaba un poco en subirse pero no, lleva así desde hace un par de días. Lagarto-lagarto(sigo sin entenderlo). ¡Menos mal que en Science las tenéis todas!. (podéis acceder a través del link superior). Los comentarios estuve ojeandolos y, que me perdonen pero no son nada del otro mundo(pa mí que no soy una experta, lo mismo a los investigadores les llenan más).

En Pubmed, figuran como "In Process" eso sí. No pierdo la esperanzan de que aparezcan todos, los cuatro(espero que no tarden otros 5 meses). ;)



Sudlow C, Macleod M, Al-Shahi Salman R, Stone J.

Science. 2010 May 14;328(5980):825; author reply 825.PMID: 20466906 [PubMed - in process]

Lloyd A, White P, Wessely S, Sharpe M, Buchwald D.

Science. 2010 May 14;328(5980):825; author reply 825.PMID: 20466905 [PubMed - in process]

van der Meer JW, Netea MG, Galama JM, van Kuppeveld FJ.

Science. 2010 May 14;328(5980):825; author reply 825.PMID: 20466904 [PubMed - in process]

Y en la referencia a la publicación de Octubre ¡tampoco viene!:

Science. 2009 Oct 23;326(5952):585-9. Epub 2009 Oct 8.

Detection of an infectious retrovirus, XMRV, in blood cells of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Lombardi VC, Ruscetti FW, Das Gupta J, Pfost MA, Hagen KS, Peterson DL, Ruscetti SK, Bagni RK, Petrow-Sadowski C, Gold B, Dean M, Silverman RH, Mikovits JA.

Whittemore Peterson Institute, Reno, NV 89557, USA.

Comment in:

Abstract

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating disease of unknown etiology that is estimated to affect 17 million people worldwide. Studying peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from CFS patients, we identified DNA from a human gammaretrovirus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), in 68 of 101 patients (67%) as compared to 8 of 218 (3.7%) healthy controls. Cell culture experiments revealed that patient-derived XMRV is infectious and that both cell-associated and cell-free transmission of the virus are possible. Secondary viral infections were established in uninfected primary lymphocytes and indicator cell lines after their exposure to activated PBMCs, B cells, T cells, or plasma derived from CFS patients. These findings raise the possibility that XMRV may be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of CFS.

PMID: 19815723 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Hay que ver ¡que cosas tan "raras" tiene la ciencia!.

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario en la entrada